Natural resources

Putri Army, Reuters, - UNEP

Brazil: Environment, polutan, protect areas in Amazon Brazil, palm oil production in Brazil, danger forestation become one protected production. Brazil is rich in a variety of natural resources and is the world's leading producer of tin, iron ore and phosphate. It has large deposits of diamonds, manganese, chromium, copper, bauxite and many other minerals. However, the country has no significant oil reserves. This is compensated for by the presence of vast tracts of undulating forest lands having considerable hydroelectric power potential producer of soybean and sugar. Brazil is rich in a variety of natural resources and is the world's leading producer of tin, iron ore and phosphate. It has large deposits of diamonds, manganese, chromium, copper, bauxite and many other minerals. However, the country has no significant oil reserves. This is compensated for by the presence of vast tracts of undulating forest lands having considerable hydroelectric power potential

 

Australia: 2011 Wood from Australia’s many forests is another natural resource that contributes to the nation’s economy, which we will mention. According to Australia’s Department of Agriculture, about 17% of the country’s land is covered in forest, with about 1.95 million hectares devoted to commercial plantations. Eucalyptus and acacia trees dominate the country’s native forests. About half of the nation’s commercial forests are exotic softwood comprised of Monterey pine, and the rest is mostly eucalyptus trees. (Monterey pine is commonly used in construction in veneer, and plywood, and is also used to make paper and boxes. For its part, Eucalyptus is often used in flooring materials, as well as for making cabinets, and as part of plywood). Natural gas is an important natural resource for Australia. The country has almost 44 times more natural gas than it consumes in one year, meaning it has about 44 years of natural gas left to use. According to Worldometers.com, Australia ranks 27th worldwide for this natural resource and is home to about 1% of the world’s natural gas. That being said, it surpassed Qatar as the world’s largest exporter of natural gas in 2019. Natural gas is exported by Australia as liquified natural gas or LNG‐ natural gas that has been cooled in order to be transported. Australia’s pockets of natural gas lie both onshore and offshore and are one of the country’s top sources of energy, along with coal and uranium.

 

UK: domestic challenges regarding palm oil deforestasi

Palm oil is the world's most popular vegetable oil. Used in most consumer goods, this particular oil may be cheap but it comes at a tremendous cost to the environment. Palm oil has been linked to many environmental, animal, and human rights violations yet companies continue to use this particular oil in everything from laundry detergent to snacks and lipstick It is clear that the world is aware of the many atrocities associated with Big Palm, so what is being done to stop it?

Oil and promised to source all their palm oil from certified, sustainable sources over the next few years. While these initiatives are amazing and could effect real change in the abusive practices of the palm oil industry, they haven't been all that successful just yet. Because palm oil supply chains can be hard to track, violations made to the RSPO's standards are a huge problem for some companies that claim to sustainably source their oil. According to the Rainforest Action Network, Cargill's lack of oversight has led to the violation of numerous RSPO measures, nullifying their efforts to reform their palm oil policy. Until there is evidence that real change has been made to ensure all palm oil is sustainably sourced it is a good idea to avoid buy products that contain palm oil all together. Here are some reasons why:

 

1. Palm oil heavily contributes to deforestation.

The palm oil industry plays a large role in human induced climate change as palm Worlds most recious carbon canturing oil plantations have cleared some of the worlds most precious, carbon capturing forests. For instance, in 2009, nearly 30 percent of Indonesia's reported carbon emissions were the result of deforestation.

2. Palm oil is driving orangutans to extinction. Scientists predict that the fragile orangutan population could become extinct within our lifetime if we continue to destroy their home and natural habitats for palm oil plantations. In the past 10 years, the orangutan population of Sumatra and Borneo has decreased by over 20,000. This sharp decline coincides with a growing . Palm oil is driving orangutans to extinction. Scientists predict that the fragile orangutan population could become extinct within our lifetime if we continue to destroy their home and natural habitats for palm oil plantations.